Skills and Training

Globalisation, rapid technological advances and shifting employment environments are changing the nature of work and the skills being demanded by business. It is vital that policy settings align individuals, businesses and government to ensure the WA labour market has the skills and capacity to drive economic growth.  

We believe people are vital to the success of Western Australian businesses. The ability to access the right skills at the right time is central to the State’s productivity and competitiveness.

We’re working for

  • Helping businesses understand how global trends are changing the nature of jobs so they can continue to find workers with the right skills. 
  • Leveraging the knowledge of the business community to improve the workplace readiness of students entering the workforce. 
  • Supporting policy measures that enhance the ability of the education sector to respond to labour market conditions.  
  • Advocating for a migration system that enables business to access critical skills when the local labour market is tight.  

Policy in action

We recently provided formal input into the Commonwealth Government’s Vocational Education and Training reform agenda. Our team have been actively involved in the co-design of the National Skills Commission and Skills Organisations Pilots to ensure that any new approach meets the unique needs of WA businesses.
Submission to the Co-designing the National Skills Commission and Skills Organisation Pilots

We made recommendations on how to ensure the Vocational Education and Training sector can respond to labour market signals and meet the skills needs of the business community in a submission to the Commonwealth Government.
Submission to the Expert Review into the Vocational Education and Training Sector

In our submission to the State Government regarding the Building and Construction Industry Training Fund (BCITF), we outlined practical steps to ensure that excessive costs are not imposed on industry and that the program is meeting its objective of increasing the number of skilled persons in the building and construction industry.
Five-yearly review of the Building and Construction Industry Training Fund Submission

Our submission to the Review of the Australian Apprenticeships National Skills Needs List highlighted problems with how occupations are currently classified, the limitations of using labour market forecasting to design training incentives, as well as the importance of supporting apprenticeships through employer-facing incentives.
Review of the Apprenticeship National Skills Needs List Submission