WA Small Business Day a chance to recognise the small business heroes across our State

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry WA (CCIWA) welcomes and celebrates WA Small Business Day. With small businesses employing 37 per cent of the state’s private sector workforce, they are the engine room of our economy and the heart of our communities.

CCIWA President, Small Business Matters co-founder and small business owner Nicolle Jenkins said WA Small Business Day is an opportunity to celebrate and unite small business owners.

“Supporting and celebrating our small business community is vital. When a small business disappears, we see reduced competition, less product diversity, less money going back into WA, less support for your community and fewer jobs,” Jenkins said.

“Where we shop creates the communities we live in. When we support a small business the return to our local community is significant. When we take the time to think about how we shop and where we shop, a small change can make a momentous difference.”

In the lead up to Christmas, Small Business Matters and CCIWA are asking everyone to take the small business pledge #MySmallPledge and buy some of their Christmas gifts from a WA small business.

The WA Small Business Day is an initiative of Small Business Matters, a movement created to celebrate and recognise WA small business and entrepreneurship.

In 2021 Small Business Matters is proudly supported by WA business and CCIWA member, Plico. Plico’s ambitious target is to deliver clean, reliable energy to every Australian household and small business.

To complement Small Business Day, yesterday CCIWA also held its regular Small Business Summit. While many businesses recognised that Western Australia has fared extremely well through the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns regarding skill shortages, supply chain disruptions, and ongoing border closures were front of mind.

On this, small businesses are twice as likely to be reporting tough operating conditions, compared to larger businesses. In addition, more than half of small businesses are reporting difficulty filling skilled and unskilled worker positions, with many unable to compete on higher pay rates.

Businesses put forward a range of practical reforms that need to be taken forward, including with respect to industrial relations policy, state tax reform, greater access to skilled workers, and a plan to reopen WA’s economy.

CCIWA CEO Chris Rodwell heaped praise on those small business owners who participated in the Summit.

The passion and energy of small business owners is what drives this State. The expectations of government often place a huge load on them. Some have performed well through this period, some have struggled with the restrictions. Whichever, their workload has been huge and their stresses many. We’re committed as ever to prosecuting the case for reform that help support them, the entire economy and communities across the State.”

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