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3 unexpected ways WA business gives back

By CCIWA Editor

While COVID-19 has seen WA band together across sectors to protect the community, we've found three less-expected ways businesses give back, every day.

Registering their defib

Businesses across WA have registered their defibrillators to help reach more cardiac arrest victims before an ambulance arrives.

The St John WA's Community First Responder service has seen more than 6000 devices, and 26,000 first-aid trained people, sign up to respond.

If a member of the community goes into cardiac arrest, the app alerts nearby first responders, and gives the location of nearby defibrillators.

St John WA recommends installing defibrillators in a lockable box with a code, making it available to the community outside business hours.

Smart hiring

Inclusive workplaces are a win-win for community and business.

One report showed employees working in an inclusive team are 19 times more likely to be very satisfied with their job, and 10 times more likely to be highly effective.

But Apprenticeship Support Australia Manager Lena Constantine says consciously opening up roles to groups with lower workforce participation rates can also have a huge impact on the economy.

"It allows employers to better reflect the community in which they operate, and can change an individual's life substantially."

There are a range of organisations that can support diversity in hiring.

For example, Edge Employment Solutions help businesses identify suitable jobs for people with disability, and match candidates to the position.

Networks like ICNWA’s Aboriginal Business Directory WA – which connects projects to accredited Aboriginal-run companies – also play a role.

Prompt payments

Cashflow and prompt payment is critical for small business owners, especially in the current economy.

While delays in payment to subcontractors has drawn media ire, many WA companies are setting up their own process to ensure they pay invoices in a timely way.

The recent introduction of the Payment Times Reporting Bill 2020 is another sign of positive change.

Businesses and government enterprises with a total annual income over $100 million are now required to report their payment practices for small business suppliers.

The WA Government’s current 20-day invoice payment time is also set to receive more attention this election, with the State Opposition promising five-day payment of invoices under $1m.

While COVID-19 has seen WA band together across sectors to protect the community, we've found three less-expected ways businesses give back, every day.
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